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Transformative Urban Mobility Initiative (TUMI) at ITF Summit 2017

Transformative Urban Mobility Initiative (TUMI) at ITF Summit 2017

The planning and implementation of sustainable urban mobility is complex and requires high cooperation between different public, but also private and civil stakeholders. This is...
How do we get urban transport to deliver on global climate targets?

How do we get urban transport to deliver on global climate targets?

To maintain the agreed international schedule, the sector will need to move beyond fossil fuels shortly after 2050 in the world’s most advanced regions, and by 2070...
Using GPS technology for demand data collection

Using GPS technology for demand data collection

Travel demand data is a necessary basis for urban mobility planning, but especially in developing and emerging economies data availability is often weak or non-existing. The...

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SUTP-Webinar – Road safety, active mobility and health: how local and global agendas become reality by better design and planning (Tuesday, May 23)

We cordially invite you to join the second webinar in 2017 on Tuesday, May 23. Please feel free to share this information with interested contacts.

In this webinar Jonathon Passmore (WHO) will elaborate the various objectives and provide insight to some of the national government strategies to improve road safety. Gregor Mews (Urban Synergies Group) will link public health to active mobility and outline the implication for planning and "healthy" road and urban design. This will be supported by case studies on local level and exemplary interventions in built environment.

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A Comprehensive Approach for Road Safety – The Example of Germany - Now also in Persian language

About 3,400 people die every day in road traffic accidents around the world. Despite comparatively low levels of individual motorisation, emerging economies and developing countries are particularly affected, with more than 90 per cent of traffic-related deaths occurring in these countries. If current trends continue, road accidents will overtake HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis to become the world’s third most significant health hazard by 2030.

 
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